And Then There Were Three Republican
Candidates — And Two Of
Them Are Dominionists

By Susie Madrak


PREFACE

It is interesting — perhaps the better word is "frightening" — to note that with each passing election cycle the candidate advanced by the Republican Party is ever more the captive of the Religious Right.

The candidacy and election of George Bush II in 2000 reached an ominous high when he openly allied himself with the Promise Keepers and began to preach what Gail Sheehy called a "Promise Keeper" agenda.

Sheehy says that by using this new rhetoric - something no president, not even Reagan, had ever done before, at least not on such a deliberate and premeditated basis - Bush began tapping into a mindset in the culture that had grown increasingly weary of the hedonism of the last forty years - a weariness that the Clintons and their cabal of hard-core "libertines" and "debauchers" had done so much to exacerbate.

But all the rhetoric that Bush successfully used in 2000 is "small potatoes" compared to the rhetoric being used today by both Rick Parry and Michelle Bachman, two of the three leading candidates for the Republican Party's nomination in 2012. It doesn't need to be said that the inexorable movement of the Republican Party in this direction is very ominous and threatening — AT LEAST INSOFAR AS THE PROPHETIC SCRIPTURES ARE CONCERNED which foresee the union of church and state in the "Last Days" as a precursor to the rise of the antichrist. [Please see Chapter XIII of the New Antipas Papers: "The Woman of Revelation 17."]

Rex quondam, rex que futurus Restitutor Orbis
Sir Thomas Malory

Max Mell, a contemporary poet, has said that underneath the thin "egalitarianism" of today's American culture and all of its shallow, perfunctory pandering to the "worth of the common man" lies a great longing for that which is messianic; for a savior - a kind of Resitiutor Orbis who will emerge and rescue mankind from the chaos and confusion of this present evil world; and this is especially true among Christians, many of whom, sadly, hold the concepts of what we today call "democracy" in UTTER contempt. To their mind, messianic leadership (by which they mean, "charismatic" leadership) - not democracy - is the ideal. To such people, the messy and disordered condition of "politics as usual" - with all its sordid, back room deal-making and compromises - is a disgusting and vulgar thing.

Mell thinks that it would be a great mistake to believe that such thinking is nothing more than a silly "redneck" kind of aberration that haunts only the fringe elements of American culture. He believes that the longing for such a "messiah-king" rests on a solid bedrock of Western tradition and is very widespread in the culture at large. It's a yearning that the forces of modernity can hide and gloss over, but one which they have utterly failed to stamp out. It is too deeply embedded in the Western psyche to be readily rooted out - and so much so that British writers Norris J. Lacy and Geoffrey Ashe can say that the longing for such a "messiah-king" has been "... a persistently imagined and hoped for political goal of countless numbers of people down through the centuries" - a kind of hunger for a messianic leader who, as Carolly Erickson, a professor at the University of California at Santa Barbara, writes, "... has the ability to dwell in the circle of the miraculous." Indeed, IT IS PRECISELY THIS KIND OF "MESSIAH-KING" - the kind out from which such ancient mythical heroes as Arthur, Lancelot, Tristan, Parsifal, and Roland were fashioned - THAT MODERN-DAY CHRISTIAN GROUPS HAVE MADE SUCH A PHANTASM OUT OF.

This kind of thinking - the kind that Max Mell, Norris Lacy, Geoffrey Ashe and Carolly Erickson describe, the kind that generates "messiah-kings" - seems to present itself on a regular (if not cyclical) basis in the history of Western Civilization, producing in its wake the Barbarossas, the Napoleons, and the Hitlers of Western Christendom. It's a phenomenon that inevitably bubbles to the surface in times of great peril when it seems that only "decisive" leadership can carry the day - and it is helped along when it is has been preceded by a time of cultural dissonance, demoralization, and disappointment; for example, the cultural and economic turmoil and confusion that accompanied the socialist governments of the Weimar Republic that antedated Hitler's rise to power in Germany, and the so-called "Reign of Terror" that preceded Napoleon's seizure of power in France in the last decade of the Eighteenth Century.

-- Antipas

_______________________________________

I've been reading about the Dominionists (in this case, Seven Mountains Dominionists and Christian Reconstruction) for more than ten years, and the more I learn, the scarier it gets. [We urge you to see our lengthy and very detailed articles on this phenomenon, "Today's Church: Making Zombies out of Christians," "The Obermenschen," "Crossing the Rubicon" and "The Invasion of Europe by America's Apostate Church."]

PLEASE SEE THIS VIDEO:

The video is by Christine Amanpour — a fierce opponent of evangelical Christianity; nonetheless her report on what's happening regarding the marriage of church and state is accurate; we hope you can see past her bias and understand the truth of what she is reporting.

With Tim Pawlenty out of the presidential race, it is now fairly clear that the GOP candidate will either be Mitt Romney or someone who makes George W. Bush look like Tom Paine. Of the three most plausible candidates for the Republican nomination, two are deeply associated with a theocratic strain of Christian fundamentalism known as Dominionism. If you want to understand Michele Bachmann and Rick Perry, understanding Dominionism isn't optional. [Please see our article, "The Rise of Dominionism: Remaking America as a Christian Nation."]

Put simply, Dominionism means that Christians have a God-given right to rule all earthly institutions. Originating among some of America's most radical theocrats, it's long had an influence on religious-right education and political organizing. But because it seems so outré, getting ordinary people to take it seriously can be difficult. Most writers, myself included, who explore it have been called paranoid. In a contemptuous 2006 First Things review of several books, including Kevin Phillips' American Theocracy, and my own Kingdom Coming: The Rise of Christian Nationalism, conservative columnist Ross Douthat wrote,

"... the fear of theocracy has become a defining panic of the Bush era."

Now, however, we have the most theocratic Republican field in American history, and suddenly, the concept of Dominionism is reaching mainstream audiences. Writing about Bachmann in The New Yorker this month, Ryan Lizza spent several paragraphs explaining how the premise fit into the Minnesota congresswoman's intellectual and theological development. And a recent Texas Observer cover story on Rick Perry examined his relationship with the New Apostolic Reformation, a Dominionist variant of Pentecostalism that coalesced about a decade ago.

Forrest Wilder writes,

"[W]hat makes the New Apostolic Reformation movement so potent is its growing fascination with infiltrating politics and government.  Its members "believe Christians—certain Christians—are destined to not just take 'dominion' over government, but stealthily climb to the commanding heights of what they term the 'Seven Mountains' of society, including the media and the arts and entertainment world."

In many ways, Dominionism is more a political phenomenon than a theological one. It cuts across Christian denominations, from stern, austere sects to the signs-and-wonders culture of modern megachurches. Think of it like political Islamism, which shapes the activism of a number of antagonistic fundamentalist movements, from Sunni Wahabis in the Arab world to Shiite fundamentalists in Iran.

Yep, and what they have in mind is the Christian fundamentalist version of sharia law. It's important that we learn about this, but even more important that members of the media educate themselves.

_____________________________

God bless you all!

S.R. Shearer
Antipas Ministries

***

FOR THOSE OF YOU WHO WANT TO FELLOWSHIP ON HOW TO GO ON IN THESE DANGEROUS AND TROUBLED TIMES, WE URGE YOU TO CONTACT US AT: [email protected].

***

IN ADDITION, WE URGE YOU TO DOWNLOAD THE NEW ANTIPAS PAPERS, PRINT THEM OUT YOURSELF, AND STUDY THEM CAREFULLY; SHARE THEM WITH YOUR FRIENDS.

YOU MAY DOWNLOAD THEM FREE!

***

FINALLY, WE URGE YOU TO DOWNLOAD AND PRINT OUT THE FLYER WE SENT TO YOU RECENTLY.

YOU MAY DOWNLOAD THE FLYER HERE

Then make copies and take these copies out to the campuses where you live; pass them out; OR if that seems too "daring" for you right now, post them on telephone poles, the sides of buildings, on campus bulletin boards; post them in union halls, in the neighborhoods of the poor and downtrodden, near employment offices, wherever you can.


Once again, we URGE you to read (or re-read):

We need your help to spread the word concerning Antipas Ministries and the eschatological viewpoint it represents; WE NEED YOUR HELP BECAUSE WE DO NOT "LINK" WITH OTHER SO-CALLED "CHRISTIAN" WEBSITES which are, for the most part, "in the tank" insofar as their loyalty to the United States is concerned - a loyalty that has made them partners in the BLOODY trail the American military has left in its TERROR-RIDDEN rampage throughout the world, as well as making them partners in the abject poverty that American corporations have imposed on the peoples and nations the American military machine has ravaged - A BLOODY, TERROR-RIDDEN RAMPAGE THAT HAS TO A LARGE DEGREE BEEN CARRIED OUT IN THE NAME OF THE "PRINCE OF PEACE." [Please see our articles, "The Third World as a Model for the New World Order," Inside the American New World Order System" and "The American Empire: The Corporate / Pentagon / CIA / Missionary Archipelago."]

YOU CAN HELP BY EMAILING THIS ARTICLE TO
YOUR FRIENDS AND NEIGHBORS

PRESS HERE


HOME | ARTICLES | ABOUT US | SUPPORT US | CONTACT US
© Antipas Ministries